Lesson Learned

Besides learning about steps that engineers take to identify problems, brainstorm/assess their ideas, evaluate their product requirement, and build their own prototype; we also looked at different fail engineering projects and evaluated them: Titanic, Tacoma bridge, the Hindenburg and etc. 

Tipping of the Titanic

Image result for titanic sink 1942Most of us might have already heard of this elegant ship that got struck by the iceberg and sank into the Atlantic ocean in 1942, which killed more than 1,500 people. The main reason which causes this largest ship to sink is that of its watertight compartments—which engineers believed could never flood ship—didn’t get sealed and had filled up with water; this led the ship to tilt to one side and eventually sink. 

The Toppling of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge

This bridge was built across Puget Sound in Washington. It was a strong, light, narrow, and very flexible. Due to the strong wind (42 mph) on November 7th, 1940, had caused this 2,800-foot (853-m) bridge into a series of torsional oscillations and eventually collapse. 

The Hindenburg Disaster 

The main lesson that we learned from these fail engineering projects is that when we design our product, we have to consider all the possibility that could affect our product and should always test it in the real environment. 

S’more | Stoichiometry

Have you had s’more before? What was it like? Was it good? 

If you (like me) didn’t know what the heck it is,  it is an amazing campfire snack in North America (according to Google) but as a Cambodian, I had never heard of or taste it before. Yet, last week in my Chemistry class, we did a S’more Lab to further our understanding and knowledge about limiting reactants (and get to taste it for the first time). 

We were given Graham crackers (Gc), marshmallow (M), chocolate piece (Cp) to make our own s’more. During the lab, we were required to balance out the equation and figure out limiting and excess reactants as well as calculate the experimental and theoretical yield. I have such a great time with my team doing the lab, by the way. 

  2Gc + M  + 3CP → Gc2MCp3   

This lab, not only it’s a lot of fun, but it had helped me to better understand about experimental and theoretical yield since I wasn’t sure on how to apply it into real life. Overall, I had such an incredible time do the lab and be able to learn about limiting reactants and make our own s’more. Yum! Yum!

The Exceptional Trailblazer

My engineering seminar this year was very inspiring since my new facilitator had greatly persuaded me to be interested in the engineering field. One of the things that we had done for this round was researching about an influential engineer to understand their journey and their characteristic as an engineer. Below is my research paper about an exceptional engineer in the past…


Imagine if you were born to be a girl in the early 1900s, where meeting society expectation matter more than your own, what choice will you make? Follow society or yourself?

Historically, women were “confined to the home and expected to uphold traditional roles as a wife and mother.” They did not have the chance to discover or chase their dreams without receiving a reprimand.

Yet, by the start of the 20th century, there were 18.8% of women employed outside of the home as retail clerks, nurses, teachers, and typists—not as electrical engineers.

“I had always wanted to be an engineer, but felt that women were not supposed to be doing things like studying engineering.”

Continue reading “The Exceptional Trailblazer”

Flame Test Lab

Everything is made of atoms!

We all know that the best way to start a chemistry course is by learning about atoms structure and the element in the periodic table. Well, for my chemistry class this round we did this one cool lab called the Flame Test, in the purpose of understanding how the electron(s) of an element reacts to heat. 

We measured the result of the electron reaction through observing the color of the element when it’s in contact with flame. The reason that we see the colors is that of the energy that emitted by each electron when they excited corresponding to a wavelength of a particular light. 

One of the challenges that my team faced was that some pieces of the element dropped onto the bunsen burner tip so we had to make sure that it clean at all cost when we tested another element. Furthermore, when we tested the potassium chloride, we didn’t see the color change of the flame, so we just assume that the electrons gave out orange, which it isn’t accurate at all. Subsequently, this was a really fascinating and fun lab to do!